Posts Tagged ‘tea’

A Forager Forgives: Rosehips Revisited

December 10, 2008

The first “wild” food I tried in order to generate material for this weblog was rosehips.  For that entry, I tried some withered old fruits that were not very good.  This year’s attempt went a lot better.

Finding Rosehips
I had my eye on a wild rose in my foraging grounds, but it bore tiny TicTac sized hips.  I went back to the few roses I have in my yard—one shrub and one climber.  I’d love to find a wild source of rosehips, but I imagine I could find an ample supply in some of the more affluent neighborhoods in town.

Harvesting Rosehips
My field guide recommended I pick rosehips that had turned orange, indicating ripeness.  I only had a few orange hips ready to go, so I picked a few green hips, as well.  It didn’t seem to make much difference.

Preparing Rosehips
After gathering a handful of rosehips, I trimmed the stems and brushed the blossom end off a little to remove the stamens (or whatever it is at the end of a rosehip).  I sliced them in half, and poured boiling water over them.  After 10 minutes, I poured the tea through a sieve into a cup.  I served it as a tea with a little honey.

Eating Rosehips
I was deliriously ill when I tried this, so I concede I may not be qualified to comment.  The tea was a bit bland, but the honey made it more palatable.  Rose hip tea is reputed to be very high in vitamin C, and as a means of delivering vitamins it wasn’t bad.  As a food for pleasure, it was mediocre.  If was choosing between drinking rosehip tea and getting scurvy, the choice is easy.  Choosing between rosehips and an orange, though, is just as easy.  It remains to be seen how deep I’m willing to go into this local thing.

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Winter Foraging, and Preparing for Spring Gardens

February 9, 2008

Back in the day when human beings depended on foraging for survival, there was not, I suspect, a lot of people spending winters in the Michigan area. I started this weblog as motivation to try new local and wild foods, but my decision to start in the dead of winter may have been a little misguided. Regardless, I’ve come up with a few snowbound topics.

Rose Hips

Not quite “wild”, but definitely local–the rose bush in my backyard, the last survivor of three planted by the previous owner, bloomed fairly well this year. I dutifully dead-headed, cutting off blooms that were past their prime. This ritual stimulates the rose to continue blooming. As fall approached, I let the rose blossoms mature, lose their petals, and set fruit. The orangey, marble-sized hips remain on the bush throughout winter. They are reportedly rich in vitamin C, which is not easy to come by locally in midwinter.

I prepared the hips in the recommended manner–gather a handful, pour hot water over them, and let steep for 10 minutes. This results in a pinkish intiction that was no great pleasure to drink. It may be the variety of rose (some may taste better than others), or the quality of the hips–by the time of harvest, mine had been through several freezes and thaws, with temperatures from freezing up through the seventies and back to freezing again. Like the brussel sprouts still frozen in my backyard, which are cooking up mushy these days, the rose hips may have seen better days. I will definitely try this earlier next season, and will try new varieties, but would have to be looking scurvy in the eye to revisit the beverage I’ve just finished.

Starting Seeds

In the dank, moldy shower stall in the corner of our basement, I’ve set up a two-level greenhouse to get a head start on the growing season. It’s a pretty crude affair–two scrap lumber frames, covered in lathe slats, with some discount flourescent lighting rigs. I lined the glass door with aluminum foil to reflect the light back into the shower stall, and have all of my lights plugged into a single powerstrip, which allows for easy on-off every morning and evening. To the casual observer, it looks an awful lot like I’m growing marijuana on a commercial scale. My digital camera is not functioning at the moment, but I’d like to provide some pictures in the future.

It’s well ahead of our last frost-free date (sometime in May), but I started a few things this week. In addition to some early flowers, I’ve got spinach and lettuce, which will go into the cold-frame for an early salad crop, and asparagus. Last year, the asparagus I grew from seed was completely eaten by slugs within two days of setting it out. I then purchased two dozen year-old roots, which will be entering their second year this spring (harvest is supposed to start at the three-year mark). By starting from seed again this year, I put myself a year into the hole and risk another slug attack, but I’ll save a considerable sum of money over buying roots. I also feed into an illogical drive for legitimacy, according to which growing from seed is more respectable than any shortcut. If my seed-starting fails again this year, I’ll be humbly purchasing and planting asparagus crowns when the soil can be worked.